JASSS logo


6 articles matched your search for the keywords:
Children Education, Multi-Agent Environment, Role-Playing Game

Role-Playing Games for Opening the Black Box of Multi-Agent Systems: Method and Lessons of Its Application to Senegal River Valley Irrigated Systems

Olivier Barreteau, François Bousquet and Jean-Marie Attonaty
Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation 4 (2) 5

Kyeywords: Multi-Agent Systems, Role-Playing Games, Validation, Negotiation Support Tool, Legitimisation, Irrigated Systems
Abstract: Multi-agent systems and role playing games have both been developed separately and offer promising potential for synergetic joint use in the field of renewable resource management, for research, training and negotiation support. While multi-agent systems may give more control over the processes involved in role playing games, role playing games are good at explaining the content of multi-agent systems. The conversion of one tool to another is quite easy but organisation of game sessions is more difficult. Both these tools have been used jointly in a fully described experiment in the Senegal river valley for issues of co-ordination among farmers. Role-playing games first enabled us to work on the validation of the MAS. Subsequently, the combination of both tools has proved to be an effective discussion support tool.

A Role-Playing Game in Irrigated System Negotiation: Between Play and Reality

William's Daré and Olivier Barreteau
Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation 6 (3) 6

Kyeywords: Role-Playing Game, Social Reality, Senegal, Irrigated System, Conversational Analysis
Abstract: Associations of multi-agent systems and role-playing games (RPG) have shown their relevance to tackle complex and dynamic social systems sharing common resources. Now, some are used in participatory processes as group decision support tools to promote information exchange of between stakeholders. In a RPG, stakeholders are placed in a virtual world where roles are allotted and rules are defined. In this approach, a question arises: do they adhere to the rules given by the game or do they use parts of their own reality? This article focuses on the link between play and reality in negotiation processes. The research was conducted in irrigated systems of the Senegal River valley. A methodology is proposed to test how reality is brought into the game. Qualitative interviews about negotiation processes in reality and in the game allowed us to analyze interactions and behaviors of participants. Results showed in the case presented that (1) stakeholders have accepted the schematic representation of their reality, (2) the social background of players interferes with roles playing in the game, (3) the game reveals to observers social relationships between players.

Agent-Based Participatory Simulations: Merging Multi-Agent Systems and Role-Playing Games

Paul Guyot and Shinichi Honiden
Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation 9 (4) 8

Kyeywords: Agent-Based Participatory Simulations, Multi-Agent Systems, Role-Playing Games, Validation, Negotiation Support Tool
Abstract: In 2001, Olivier Barreteau proposed to jointly use multi-agent systems and role-playing games for purposes of research, training and negotiation support in the field of renewable resource management. This joint use was later labeled the "MAS/RPG methodology" and this approach is one of the foundation stones of the ComMod movement. In this article, we present an alternative method called "agent-based participatory simulations". These simulations are multi-agent systems where human participants control some of the agents. The experiments we conducted prove that it is possible to successfully merge multi-agent systems and role-playing games. We argue that agent-based participatory simulations are also a significant improvement over the MAS/RPG approach, opening new perspectives and solving some of the problems generated by the joint use of role-playing games and multi-agent systems. The advantages are at least threefold. Because all interactions are computer mediated, they can be recorded and this record can be processed and used to improve the understanding of participants and organizers alike. Because of the merge, agent-based participatory simulations decrease the distance between the agent-based model and the behavior of participants. Agent-based participatory simulations allow for computer-based improvements such as the introduction of eliciting assistant agents with learning capabilities.

Using Computational Agents to Design Participatory Social Simulations

Minh Nguyen-Duc and Alexis Drogoul
Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation 10 (4) 5

Kyeywords: Participatory Social Simulations, Agent-Based Social Simulations, Computational Agents, Role-Playing Games, Artificial Maieutics, User-Centered Design
Abstract: In social science, the role of stakeholders is increasing in the development and use of simulation models. Their participation in the design of agent-based models (ABMs) has widely been considered as an efficient solution to the validation of this particular type of model. Traditionally, "agents" (as basic model elements) have not been concerned with stakeholders directly but via designers or role-playing games (RPGs). In this paper, we intend to bridge this gap by introducing computational or software agents, implemented from an initial ABM, into a new kind of RPG, mediated by computers, so that these agents can interact with stakeholders. This interaction can help not only to elicit stakeholders' informal knowledge or unpredicted behaviours, but also to control stakeholders' focus during the games. We therefore formalize a general participatory design method using software agents, and illustrate it by describing our experience in a project aimed at developing agent-based social simulations in the field of air traffic management.

An Analysis of the Insertion of Virtual Players in GMABS Methodology Using the Vip-JogoMan Prototype

Diana Adamatti, Jaime Simão Sichman and Helder Coelho
Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation 12 (3) 7

Kyeywords: Role-Playing Games, Multi-Agent Based Simulation, Natural Resources, Virtual Players
Abstract: The GMABS (Games and Multi-Agent-Based Simulation) methodology was created from the integration of RPG and MABS techniques. This methodology links the dynamic capacity of MABS (Multi-Agent-Based Simulation) and the discussion and learning capacity of RPG (Role-Playing Games). Using GMABS, we have developed two prototypes in the natural resources management domain. The first prototype, called JogoMan (Adamatti et. al, 2005), is a paper-based game: all players need to be physically present in the same place and time, and there is a minimum needed number of participants to play the game. In order to avoid this constraint, we have built a second prototype, called ViP-JogoMan (Adamatti et. al, 2007), which is an extension of the first one. This second game enables the insertion of virtual players that can substitute some real players in the game. These virtual players can partially mime real behaviors and capture autonomy, social abilities, reaction and adaptation of the real players. We have chosen the BDI architecture to model these virtual players, since its paradigm is based on folk psychology; hence, its core concepts easily map the language that people use to describe their reasoning and actions in everyday life. ViP-JogoMan is a computer-based game, in which people play via Web, players can be in different places and it does not have a hard constraint regarding the minimum number of real players. Our aim in this paper is to present some test results obtained with both prototypes, as well as to present a preliminary discussion on how the insertion of virtual players has affected the game results.

Role-Playing Game and Learning for Young People About Sustainable Development Stakes: An Experiment in Transferring and Adapting Interdisciplinary Scientific Knowledge

Françoise Gourmelon, Mathias Rouan, Jean-François Lefevre and Anne Rognant
Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation 14 (4) 21

Kyeywords: Children Education, Multi-Agent Environment, Role-Playing Game
Abstract: The study refers to the interactions between socio-economic and natural dynamics in an island biosphere reserve by using companion modelling. This approach provides scientific results and involves interdisciplinarity. In the second phase of the study, we transferred knowledge by adapting the main research output, a role-playing game, to young people. Our goal was to introduce interactions between social and ecological systems, coastal dynamics and integrated management. Adapting the game required close collaboration between the scientists and educators in order to transform both its substance and form and to run it with an easy-to-handle ergonomic platform.