Citing this article

A standard form of citation of this article is:

Crooks, Andrew, Hudson-Smith, Andrew and Dearden, Joel (2009). 'Agent Street: An Environment for Exploring Agent-Based Models in Second Life'. Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation 12(4)10 <http://jasss.soc.surrey.ac.uk/12/4/10.html>.

The following can be copied and pasted into a Bibtex bibliography file, for use with the LaTeX text processor:

@article{crooks2009,
title = {Agent Street: An Environment for Exploring Agent-Based Models in Second Life},
author = {Crooks, Andrew and Hudson-Smith, Andrew and Dearden, Joel},
journal = {Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation},
ISSN = {1460-7425},
volume = {12},
number = {4},
pages = {10},
year = {2009},
URL = {http://jasss.soc.surrey.ac.uk/12/4/10.html},
keywords = {Agent-Based Modelling, Pedestrian Evacuation, Segregation, Virtual Worlds, Second Life},
abstract = {Urban models can be seen on a continuum between iconic and symbolic. Generally speaking, iconic models are physical versions of the real world at some scaled down representation, while symbolic models represent the system in terms of the way they function replacing the physical or material system by some logical and/or mathematical formulae. Traditionally iconic and symbolic models were distinct classes of model but due to the rise of digital computing the distinction between the two is becoming blurred, with symbolic models being embedded into iconic models. However, such models tend to be single user. This paper demonstrates how 3D symbolic models in the form of agent-based simulations can be embedded into iconic models using the multi-user virtual world of Second Life. Furthermore, the paper demonstrates Second Life's potential for social science simulation. To demonstrate this, we first introduce Second Life and provide two exemplar models; Conway's Game of Life, and Schelling's Segregation Model which highlight how symbolic models can be viewed in an iconic environment. We then present a simple pedestrian evacuation model which merges the iconic and symbolic together and extends the model to directly incorporate avatars and agents in the same environment illustrating how 'real' participants can influence simulation outcomes. Such examples demonstrate the potential for creating highly visual, immersive, interactive agent-based models for social scientists in multi-user real time virtual worlds. The paper concludes with some final comments on problems with representing models in current virtual worlds and future avenues of research.},
}

The following can be copied and pasted into a text file, which can then be imported into a reference database that supports imports using the RIS format, such as Reference Manager and EndNote.


TY - JOUR
TI - Agent Street: An Environment for Exploring Agent-Based Models in Second Life
AU - Crooks, Andrew
AU - Hudson-Smith, Andrew
AU - Dearden, Joel
Y1 - 2009/10/31/
JO - Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation
SN - 1460-7425
VL - 12
IS - 4
SP - 10
UR - http://jasss.soc.surrey.ac.uk/12/4/10.html
KW - Agent-Based Modelling
KW - Pedestrian Evacuation
KW - Segregation
KW - Virtual Worlds
KW - Second Life
N2 - Urban models can be seen on a continuum between iconic and symbolic. Generally speaking, iconic models are physical versions of the real world at some scaled down representation, while symbolic models represent the system in terms of the way they function replacing the physical or material system by some logical and/or mathematical formulae. Traditionally iconic and symbolic models were distinct classes of model but due to the rise of digital computing the distinction between the two is becoming blurred, with symbolic models being embedded into iconic models. However, such models tend to be single user. This paper demonstrates how 3D symbolic models in the form of agent-based simulations can be embedded into iconic models using the multi-user virtual world of Second Life. Furthermore, the paper demonstrates Second Life's potential for social science simulation. To demonstrate this, we first introduce Second Life and provide two exemplar models; Conway's Game of Life, and Schelling's Segregation Model which highlight how symbolic models can be viewed in an iconic environment. We then present a simple pedestrian evacuation model which merges the iconic and symbolic together and extends the model to directly incorporate avatars and agents in the same environment illustrating how 'real' participants can influence simulation outcomes. Such examples demonstrate the potential for creating highly visual, immersive, interactive agent-based models for social scientists in multi-user real time virtual worlds. The paper concludes with some final comments on problems with representing models in current virtual worlds and future avenues of research.
ER -