Citing this article

A standard form of citation of this article is:

Wilson, Roy (2007). 'Simulating the Effect of Social Influence on Decision-Making in Small, Task-Oriented, Groups'. Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation 10(4)4 <http://jasss.soc.surrey.ac.uk/10/4/4.html>.

The following can be copied and pasted into a Bibtex bibliography file, for use with the LaTeX text processor:

@article{wilson2007,
title = {Simulating the Effect of Social Influence on Decision-Making in Small, Task-Oriented, Groups},
author = {Wilson, Roy},
journal = {Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation},
ISSN = {1460-7425},
volume = {10},
number = {4},
pages = {4},
year = {2007},
URL = {http://jasss.soc.surrey.ac.uk/10/4/4.html},
keywords = {Social Influence; Decision Processes; Social Networks; Group Dynamics; Simulation; Agent-Based Modeling},
abstract = {This paper describes a simulation study of decision-making. It is based on a model of social influence in small, task-oriented, groups. A process model of dyadic social influence is built on top of a dynamic model of status and task participation that describes the emergence of a stable power and prestige order. Two models of group decision-making are examined: a static model for which the beliefs of actors do not change, and a process model for which they do as a function of the standing of each member of each interacting pair in the evolving power and prestige order. The models are compared on a set of N=111 cases, each requiring an affirmative or negative group response to a proposition A(c) that pertains to a case c. Initial beliefs are assigned to each of five members of distinct professions based on an analysis of independently collected behavioral data pertinent to the proposition to be affirmed or denied in each case. Although the two influence models yield identical decisions in 70\% of the cases examined, the differences between them are statistically significant and in several instances show a medium effect size. Most importantly, the differences can be explained in terms of social influence and the status and task participation model on which it depends.},
}

The following can be copied and pasted into a text file, which can then be imported into a reference database that supports imports using the RIS format, such as Reference Manager and EndNote.


TY - JOUR
TI - Simulating the Effect of Social Influence on Decision-Making in Small, Task-Oriented, Groups
AU - Wilson, Roy
Y1 - 2007/10/31
JO - Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation
SN - 1460-7425
VL - 10
IS - 4
SP - 4
UR - http://jasss.soc.surrey.ac.uk/10/4/4.html
KW - Social Influence; Decision Processes; Social Networks; Group Dynamics; Simulation; Agent-Based Modeling
N2 - This paper describes a simulation study of decision-making. It is based on a model of social influence in small, task-oriented, groups. A process model of dyadic social influence is built on top of a dynamic model of status and task participation that describes the emergence of a stable power and prestige order. Two models of group decision-making are examined: a static model for which the beliefs of actors do not change, and a process model for which they do as a function of the standing of each member of each interacting pair in the evolving power and prestige order. The models are compared on a set of N=111 cases, each requiring an affirmative or negative group response to a proposition A(c) that pertains to a case c. Initial beliefs are assigned to each of five members of distinct professions based on an analysis of independently collected behavioral data pertinent to the proposition to be affirmed or denied in each case. Although the two influence models yield identical decisions in 70% of the cases examined, the differences between them are statistically significant and in several instances show a medium effect size. Most importantly, the differences can be explained in terms of social influence and the status and task participation model on which it depends.
ER -