Citing this article

A standard form of citation of this article is:

Németh, András and Takács, Károly (2007). 'The Evolution of Altruism in Spatially Structured Populations'. Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation 10(3)4 <http://jasss.soc.surrey.ac.uk/10/3/4.html>.

The following can be copied and pasted into a Bibtex bibliography file, for use with the LaTeX text processor:

@article{nemeth2007,
title = The Evolution of Altruism in Spatially Structured Populations,
author = N\'{e}meth, Andr\'{a}s and Tak\'{a}cs, K\'{a}roly,
journal = Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation,
ISSN = 1460-7425,
volume = 10,
number = 3,
pages = 4,
year = 2007,
URL = http://jasss.soc.surrey.ac.uk/10/3/4.html,
keywords = Altruism, Teaching, Knowledge Transfer, Spatially Structured Social Dilemmas,
abstract = The evolution of altruism in humans is still an unresolved puzzle. Helping other individuals is often kinship-based or reciprocal. Several examples show, however, that altruism goes beyond kinship and reciprocity and people are willing to support unrelated others even when this is at a cost and they receive nothing in exchange. Here we examine the evolution of this "pure" altruism with a focus on altruistic teaching. Teaching is modeled as a knowledge transfer which enhances the survival chances of the recipient, but reduces the reproductive efficiency of the provider. In an agent-based simulation we compare evolutionary success of genotypes that have willingness to teach with those who do not in two different scenarios: random matching of individuals and spatially structured populations. We show that if teaching ability is combined with an ability to learn and individuals encounter each other on a spatial proximity basis, altruistic teaching will attain evolutionary success in the population. Settlement of the population and accumulation of knowledge are emerging side-products of the evolution of altruism. In addition, in large populations our simple model also produces a counterintuitive result that increasing the value of knowledge keeps fewer altruists alive.,
}

The following can be copied and pasted into a text file, which can then be imported into a reference database that supports imports using the RIS format, such as Reference Manager and EndNote.


TY - JOUR
TI - The Evolution of Altruism in Spatially Structured Populations
AU - Németh, András
AU - Takács, Károly
Y1 - 2007/06/30
JO - Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation
SN - 1460-7425
VL - 10
IS - 3
SP - 4
UR - http://jasss.soc.surrey.ac.uk/10/3/4.html
KW - Altruism
KW - Teaching
KW - Knowledge Transfer
KW - Spatially Structured Social Dilemmas
N2 - The evolution of altruism in humans is still an unresolved puzzle. Helping other individuals is often kinship-based or reciprocal. Several examples show, however, that altruism goes beyond kinship and reciprocity and people are willing to support unrelated others even when this is at a cost and they receive nothing in exchange. Here we examine the evolution of this "pure" altruism with a focus on altruistic teaching. Teaching is modeled as a knowledge transfer which enhances the survival chances of the recipient, but reduces the reproductive efficiency of the provider. In an agent-based simulation we compare evolutionary success of genotypes that have willingness to teach with those who do not in two different scenarios: random matching of individuals and spatially structured populations. We show that if teaching ability is combined with an ability to learn and individuals encounter each other on a spatial proximity basis, altruistic teaching will attain evolutionary success in the population. Settlement of the population and accumulation of knowledge are emerging side-products of the evolution of altruism. In addition, in large populations our simple model also produces a counterintuitive result that increasing the value of knowledge keeps fewer altruists alive.
ER -